DC Madam trial transcript excerpt

Author’s note: Below is a brief exchange from the trial transcript for April 10th, 2008. It was striking how poor and lacking-in-detail coverage from Palfrey’s trial was. Reading the transcripts themselves, it’s not difficult to understand why–it was little more than a formality to hold it, and Palfrey’s criminal defense attorney–Preston Burton–didn’t fight very hard for his client.

There’s the real possibility that it’s because he’s rumored to covet a Federal Judgeship, but then there’s the fact that he’s also a partner in a law firm that does extensive contract work for the government internationally. You never know.

But that’s my opinion, decide for yourselves. I wasn’t aware of how informal and shoddy these affairs were conducted until recently, being unable to attend the trial itself. A real eye-opener, that. It must have been excruciating for any defendant to have had to sit there and watch the kangaroo court unfold before them as it surely did this April in Washington D.C.

Reading the transcript, you get the very obvious impression that the Court and the prosecution were working hard to rush the proceedings and that Burton barely mounted a defense at all. At some point, this site will be publishing the entire transcripts in-full.

From Pg. 20-21 of the April 10th, 2008 trial transcript of Deborah Jeane Palfrey

…”MS. CONNELLY: Your Honor, we have nothing further for
this witness.

THE COURT: All right, Ms. Couvillon. You may step
down. (The witness steps down.)
May I see counsel at the bench?
(Bench conference on the record.)

THE COURT: Okay. Where do we stand? Is that it?

MS. CONNELLY: For today, yes.

THE COURT: And what about these other two people?

MS. CONNELLY: Well, one of them is flying back into
town tomorrow, so she’ll be here Monday. The other one we spoke
to — well, the agent spoke yesterday to her in the hospital,
and they’ve diagnosed diverticulitis and they were just debating
when they’re going to release her. They think possibly this
weekend.

THE COURT: Do we need either one of these people? [Page Break]

MR. BUTLER: The one that’s in the hospital is
racketeering, so the answer is yes.

MS. CONNELLY: I think they both are.

THE COURT: You need all 14 acts, but you’ve got 15
now.

MR. BUTLER: We do have the burden of proof, and we
need sufficient evidence to meet that burden.

THE COURT: Yeah, but so what? There’s only 13 in
baseball. Thirteen out of 14 isn’t bad.

MS. CONNELLY: We’re at 10 out of 14 now.

MR. BUTLER: Well, I would request, Your Honor,
that (inaudible) the last day for court proceedings.

THE COURT: What can you tell us about what you’re
going to do?

MR. BURTON: My inclination is to not put on any
defense.

THE COURT: Okay. So we’re looking at one, maybe two
witnesses first thing Monday morning, and then we’re going to
argue and charge.

MR. BURTON: But we do have a rule 29.

THE COURT: Yeah, we have a rule 29. That’ll be a
lengthy argument.

MS. CONNELLY: Your Honor, do you charge first or do
we argue first?

THE COURT: I charge first.” … [Page Break]

[Original Postscript, 11.13.2008]: Talking about baseball gives one the impression that the “wall of professionalism” was basically nonexistent between the prosecution and Judge Robertson, a real convivial and friendly atmosphere between them all. You think they went out and had a drink at trial’s conclusion? I mean, really, if I was one of the AUSAs or USAs, I would’ve went out and gotten the judge laid, frankly. They had a good list of escort services in-hand, so…what scum. Yes, worse than a female pimp. The public was denied coverage of the trial because it was not only handled poorly, the proceedings were rigged from their inception.

Conspiracy Nuts

This has gone on for some time, mostly on Facebook, a place that I don’t care for, but that’s me, I don’t like the NSA and DHS being able to watch me with so much convenience. I also don’t like a bunch of scamming dweebs selling personal information about me to the corporate sector, silly, I know, how unreasonable of me. There is a species of North American male that thinks they know it all about this case, when they’ve maybe read a couple of articles. They weren’t involved in the case, never communicated with the subject Ms. Palfrey and others involved, or barely did, and hold preconceived views about the government that aren’t in line with reality that swing to the hard right, regardless of how they might describe themselves.

This is because many of them are liars and scumbags with a weird sense of entitlement that can only be found in rednecks who read occasionally. Don’t laugh–much–but they then get the mistaken idea, because they’re egotists, that they’re now an “expert” on whatever topic comes up around the stove at the county store–or when they’re passing around the crack or meth pipe for the next round of hits. Whatever they’re on, be it insanity, stupidity, hard drugs, retardation (mental, emotional, whatever), or they’re just a yammerer nobody’s had the balls to tell to shut up, I really don’t care.

Whenever I have occasion to discuss the DC Madam case with strangers, which happens more than you might think, at least half know about it, maybe more of them only dimly aware because of how it popped in-and-out of the media’s attention, so it’s a fragmentary narrative for most of them, and that’s OK. About one third of them of contend right away that Jeane was assassinated by shadowy government operatives, what I like to call the “She were suicided” theory. This is where most people are superficial and don’t pick up on the fact that they’re not talking about the case, but themselves, because, trust me, with their attitudes, it’s all about them. Mind you, they’ve already admitted to not knowing much about the case, then the next minute they’re claiming some unique knowledge of the case after they’ve run to the Boogeyman g’ubment theory number eleventy-twelve and a fire-extinguisher. These people crazy, and where I live, prevalent. Some many of them are rednecks, but many are also Catholics, mainly Polish, Italians, some Hungarians–South Bend has an interesting ethnic makeup and is unique for Indiana in some ways, not so much in others, typical, the disease of the yearning to be average and reactionary. How American. Yes, they all harbor delusions of adequacy (thanks Greg).

“What do you know about the case?” I ask many of them. At that moment it becomes clear that they were never required to back up an argument in their entire lives. Never written a thesis paper, in other words, the beginning of learning how to logically build a case for a contention. After all, you’ve now claimed some special knowledge of the case, and so, therefore, you’re responsibility now becomes backing up that argument. Are you fucking kidding me? When I begin pointing out that I actually was a participant–it’s a look you’ve never seen in your life, one of incredible fear. The look of finally being found out as a fraudulent simulacrum of a human being, a fraud, a front of a person, a facade with nothing behind it but biology and an ego, never real balls. Indeed, there are people who were part of the whole thing whose opinions and takes on the case I will never respect, some of it for similar reasons, and mostly because they’re frauds too.

For example: Alex Jones spoke with Jeane and I would never trust his opinions or claims to knowledge about the case. That’s because I know shit from shinola. I seriously doubt there’s more than maybe two people on earth who have researched this case as extensively as I have outside of the federal government, specifically investigators, but the AUSAs and Jeffrey Taylor surely know a lot, probably more than me. The problem is that they’re corrupt, incompetent, and fucking liars.

If you’re one of these kinds of people, the kind who default to “She were suicided,” this book is not for you, and I don’t want to hear from you either, I don’t want to hear your opinions. Be glad that I have the decency to give ya’lls a heads-up, because it beats you embarrassing yourself first, and me throwing gas on that fire.

I’m deeply critical of the federal government in this book, and I don’t spare anybody, not even myself. America is a mess, and we’ve been one from the start. I believe we can still fix things, but we’re going to have to shed a lot of myths and ridiculous notions of what this country is and has been about, and what it really is. This doesn’t mean that all Americans, white most of all, are specifically evil, but the system established here is a criminal one, primarily on the business side of things, but the government also behaves criminally, thanks most of all to runaway concentrated wealth and influence. With a change of mind in the public, we can pressure to regulate these distortions out of existence. A fundamental step is taxing the bastards out of existence, and returning to the taxable income of the highest percentiles that we saw during the Eisenhower administration, the immediate wake of the rise of labor and the New Deal, the most hopeful developments in American history since emancipation. Busting myths is a lot of what my account is about, and there are many surrounding this case. Nothing is separate, everything is connected, don’t kid yourself, kid. The real America isn’t the one in your head–it wouldn’t fit with all that shit in there.

Jeane wasn’t assassinated by the federal government, she died of negligence. That’s not the same. They knew she was suicidal, where I only suspected it, and did for months. Who was going to listen? I have established that there is no way that she was murdered. There’s no physical or documentary proof that this was the case, and no, carefully edited comments of Jeane saying she was afraid of being murdered in prison doesn’t meet the criteria, get real, man. This is about a demographic of scared, beady-eyed white males who are having a fucking identity crisis, not a woman’s death. They could give a shit about what happened to her and only want to push their anti-government agendas. And that’s criminal, disgusting, there are no words it’s so pathetic. Welcome, to the United States of America.